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commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
the san francisco civil rights ordinance. i am tiny [inaudible] and my comments are on behalf for a safe san francisco. as you know the coalition worked to address accountability and transparency and san francisco police department relationship with federal counter terrorism agencies and one that we worked on is within the san francisco police department between the federal bureau of investigation in the joint task force. as part of that relationship sfpd entered into a secret agreement with the fbi that did away with decades of progress in san francisco. members of this coalition have worked with supervisor jane kim's office to pass this ordinance and make sure that local and state standards apply and requires transparency in the process and that the chief issue a report on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we
've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the country, we have seen too many school districts, quite frankly, that have been slow to respond. and that is why we have to come together like this. that is why we have to get out of our lane and understand that we've
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this is
and inspired by the he revolution of 1960's and he became very involved in the civil rights activism and supporting different classes here in san francisco. he loved and grew medical cannabis and was a founding father of the patient movement and believing that everyone was-available to the medical cannabis regardless of ability to pay and he was. we are sorry about his passing, but are gravel that we got a chance to know johnathan and we will always remember him. the second item, is a resolution that i'm intrusioning declaring february fourth 2013-february 10th 2013, financial aid awareness week. and i want to thank the following my colleagues the following colleagues who have co sponsored this resolution supervisors avalos, breed, chiu, farrell, kim, mar and wiener. higher education truly is the key to success in this country and the ability of many students to attend an institution of of higher learning is based largely on their ability to secure financial assistance. i know from my own personal experience i'll not be here today sitting in this chair without the ability to have
collection. (applause) >> thank you. during his undergraduate years at ucla he participated in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
and it was a civil rights heros by the asian caucus and other and is our great alumni of san francisco state and dany tbloiver was the m c and he was wonderful and but he gave property props and recognition to some of the asian pacific islander communities like [name?] andsure coach yes, i amia who was also a great frequent friend of his as well and filipino labor leaders like larry [name?] and phillip vera cruz to hey had a aian leaders and many others from our history of struggle in the asian and pacific islanderrer community but it was a wonderful program and congratulations to the hero's program and i also p wanted to say that tomorrow another asian and pacific islander event is coming up and dean frank louis from hastings college of law has invites us to the reenactment of the major civil right case of modern europe for asian americaing were a young chinese america man was beaten to dealt by two unemployed auto workers in front of a mc donald restaurant in 1982 and this became spark how many of us became - and is so there will be a reenactment at hastings at 6:00 o'clock tomorrow and it will be
tonight to the sandy 36. >>> and it's a modern-day civil rights struggle between workers and management in the state of mississippi. i'll tell you why these nissan employees say they're being denied a voice in the workplace. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching there is more hope tonight for 11 million people who are currently living in fear. >> i'm here today because the time has come for common sense, comprehensive immigration reform. the time has come. now is the time. >> president obama went to a las vegas high school today to outline his own immigration reform plan. the cheers from the crowd tell you a lot. there are places in this country where the threat of deportation hangs over the heads of many people. >> the good news is that for the first time in many years, republicans and democrats seem ready to tackle this problem together. members of both parties in both chambers are actively working on a solution. >> so here we have the president praising the framework unveiled by eight democratic and republican senators. president obama is urging using his bully
that is powerful and does show up among civil rights activists. the more i looked a connection with russia nuia it is more widespread. think of rosa parks they all had garvey connections. there is a picture of african-american in politics that is much more complicated than we want to acknowledge. we have come to terms with our past by constructing a narrative about house slavery ends and freedom is ultimately realized so the civil-rights movement becomes the crucial and point*. and episodes, a people's movements that don't fit into better very problematic. also the scholars across the political spectrum who have an investment to deny it to. i had a lot of push back of anything i have written written, that part of what i discovered, the movement is still alive, there is a chapter in philadelphia, i organized a conference three years ago, a scholarly conference on nuia but at the last minute i advertise it in the local newspaper and 150 garvey-ites showed up. >> host: what is the garvey-ites political focus? >> guest: nuia, there are some chapters, the one in philadelphia, some in the united stat
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
of the civil right lawyer. tell me about your book. >> guest: my book is a collective pieing agraph of six african-american civil rights lawyers who practiced law during the era of segregation and it's about their struggles with civil rights and racial identity. at it about the fact that to be an african-american civil rights lawyer in this era, argue in the book, is to be caught between the black and who it world. both blacks and whites want things of these lawyers and identify with these lawyers. so, to be this kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him, was not just an african-american lawyer but member caught between the black and white world. >> host: how difficult for an african-american to become a lawyer at that time. >> guest: it's not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to good to law school like everybody everybody else, which does cost money, but it's difficult to be a lawyer because no african-american lawyer in this period is going to have white clients or very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have money and if you have money and yo
civil rights struggle. >>> plus, hillary clinton drops a few hints about her future in her state department farewell. those comments are ahead. >>> and 36 senators voted against relief for victims of hurricane sandy. >> it would have been an absolute disgrace for them to change the rules when new york and new jersey -- >> coming up, i'll take the sandy 36 to task with salon's joan walsh. [ male announcer ] red lobster is hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu! oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15! it's our new maine stays! seafood, chicken, and more! ooh! the tilapia with roasted vegetables. i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great. no more fast food friday's. we're going to go to red lobster... [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99! salad, sandwiches and more. [ sneezes ] [ sniffles ] [ female announcer ] for everything your face has to face. face it with pu
to give this district-required test because we feel this is a civil rights issue. this is a test that was brought to seattle and to complete scandal. -- under complete scandal. the board of the company that produced the test and did not disclose that when the seattle public schools purchased the map tests for over $4 million. it is not me who has a problem with that, it is the state auditor of washington state that came and found that was "an ethics violation" and "conflict of interest." that is the best part of the map test. this test is a test that is not aligned to our curriculum. our kids in ninth grade algebra are getting geometry questions that not being taught to them in that grade. what that means is it is setting them up for failure. we did not get into this job as teachers to set our kids up for failure. what is worse, this evaluation is tied to our in violation. the map test is part of grading teachers. we have kids taking a test that is not tied to what we're teaching the classroom and they can tie that to our evaluation, it is terribly unfair. finally, i think one of
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
movement as the next iteration of civil rights struggle. he probably means it. is it relevant? the unskilled immigration we have. you can argue that we are in need of 11 million new or more low skilled laborers. that will depress wages. do you note in state of nevada unemployment is over 10%. that will this do to wages for low-skilled american workers? will depress them. i can't believe the president is getting away with thatch >> on this provision is this a poisep nil >> it is potentially a poison pill. for republicans who themselveses or the voters back at home, supporters believe this amnesty. this is very difficult, the catholic churches who are supporting immigration reform, this is going to stop the bipartisan momentum in its tracks. there is a belief that president obama for tactical successes might do what he can to move the goalpost and move out the the left so it's not too much in the right at the end. maybe that is something democrats think is a shrewd plan. it's obviously going to throw gum in works. white house knows that. >> politically it's an act of sabotage. t
issues and how that's a civil rights concern and that book has taken off and inspired a lot of people and lead to the human rights commission's hearing that happened and i think as a commission we should definitely as uncomfortable and difficult this topic is we're not shying away from looking at it. we might have a different analysis but it's important to take that time so thank you. >> i want to be careful. our officers in san francisco are diverse. it's one of the most diverse in the country. we have training and occ does a mag 95-cent job looking at that and. >> >> making sure things are race thought ral and you have to be. >> >> careful when you throw things out there and our officers are the best in the business. i was speaking to officer monroe and the guy said -- >> he did that in the context of his work. >> his work. >> i got your back inspector. >> he made that distinction many times. >> right. >> put him out there in a muni uniform to buy them. we have to be careful and i love the work you're doing and work with us and don't lose that concern for the community. dr. m
is that they do not. it's really an extra benefit that our office provides. we're a civil rights office and civil right laws are not affirmative action laws and they don't say you have to do more for people with disabilities. you have to provide accommodations, particularly if requested, but because we have members who sometimes have participated on the bridge line, we have allowed that. i will get into a little bit of weeds here, we're a passive meeting body. we're not a policy-making body. the city attorney of the berkeley and state- the city of berkeley fought having a bridge line for their disability council and were successful with the state. they said that having a bridge line for council members to vote is a violation of the brown act and that to have a bridge line you have to declare the individual council member's home a meeting place. that anybody from the public could go there as well, which was goofy, but that is the law. but in any case, we have that. other public bodies don't and they don't have to. >> so they are not obligated to have these phones? >> that is correct. they are n
of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years
in egypt. it is a nightly curfew and allows for military arrests of civilians. these are exactly the civil rights that they fought for. there was an attack for three state hours and no security showed up. that is fascinating. they sent out tweets saying sos if anyone knows anyone in military or police or government please send help. january 28th, egypt but no such help was sent for over three hours. in fact, they were eventually rescued by protesters. isn't that interesting? people that are unknown assailants go in, fire in the air, loot the hotel. as they do that en masse protesters come in and help the tourists in the hotel, help the people in the hotel to get them to safety. so, in fact, here is a news report on that saying, anti-government demonstrators secured the besieged hotel and helped hotel guests flee until they were safely in taxis to the airport, as the police and army failed to come to their aid. the protesters also helped the security forces in arresting 12 people who were attempting to loot the downtown cairo hotel. now, that's really relevant because obvious times you'll h
control, why she is calling it an uphill battle. >> civil right heroes who impacted many lives, the asian- americans being honored today. . >>> more than 240 people are dead after flames swept through a nightclub in brazil earlier today. the club was at twice its mack. capacity. >> reporter: firefighters worked to contain a massive fire at a fight club sunday -- nightclub sunday. he says the blaze started at 2:00 a.m. after the insulation caught fire. there was a show going on when flames broke out. authorities said the cause of the fire is still under investigation. >> i would like to say to the people of our country that in this time of sadness we are all together. and we are going to over come this sadness while still in mourning. >> reporter: more than 200 people were killed. many from smoke inhalation. officials say 2,000 people urinside the club when the fire broke -- were inside the club when the fire broke out. this calls to mind other nightclub fires. 5 months ago a fire at a club in thailand killed four. one of the most memorable in the united states, 2003, a fire claimed 100 li
that this president has been all about enforcement. i mean, you know it better than i do. there is some civil rights folks who are entirely happy with some of the deportation policy, border enforcement has gotten a ton of money and the net inflow of new, illegal immigrants doesn't exist, basically. they're acting like he's done nothing. so this clamber for enforcement first ignores the political reality and makes me wonder if people like marco rubio are trying to have it both ways. >> they're saying enforcement as if there has not been enforcement and it's really distorting the record. but it seems like nia, the president is coming up stronger in his issues and his views and his stances. new york times, for example, reports . >> that's right. i think i'm surprised at how quickly this is happening around immigration reform. sure, there was that huge defeat the republicans face in november. but, still, the fact that we're at a point where there was this gang of aid talking about immigration, possibly something coming out of the house, too, in immigration plan and that they're talking about immigration
as one of the greatest civil rights issues facing the district. whereas decades of research has shown that providing children with early education opportunities can have significant positive impact on their growth and academic achievement. in addition for students from families who face economic linguistic and other opportunity barriers the need for and impact of this early education investment is paramount. whereas sfusd is one of the few school districts throughout california that continues to invest in early education. therefore be it resolved that the board of education of the san francisco unified school district celebrates the 70th anniversary of our early education department and our 70 year history of investment in preschool. [applause] i should have done this before the reading of the resolution so i apologize for the protocol. i need a motion and a second to hear the resolution. >> i move. >> second. >> thank you. with that taken care of are there any comments from the board or from the superintendent? vice president fewer. >> i think this is a wonderful celebration and i
-- what you think's? is closing public schools a civil rights issue? the washington post says -- other stories related to this, from "the huffington post" -- those phone numbers again -- we will start with an independent caller this morning. lou in connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i would like to see all public schools closed. public schools are a government monopoly, and utter failure. it would be like having a government monopoly in the automobile industry and we would all be driving hugos. it is a rip-off. the american people should be booked to choose the school for their children and the cost would drop in half. it is a government monopoly and is a disaster. i went through public education. i am 53 years old and i did not learn anything. it was a joke. host: what about the responsibility of your local school district as opposed to the federal government? caller: i guess it was better 30 years ago or so when i went to public school because we did not have the national education association. but i would say to close all the public schools. i am getting fleeced totall
. there are no reported injuries. one of the greatest soldiers in the civil-rights movement has died. vernon dobson. in the early 1960's, he led protest to integrate parts and committed his life to social justice. as the pastor of baltimore's union baptist church was a major figure for four decades. we had a chance to speak with 96-year-old and miller who worked with the reverend for the food bank. >> the fact that he did something. he did not just ring his hands and say, is not this terrible? he said something can be done about this. >> in a state meant, mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to the reverend for his bravery, honesty and righteous perseverance in the face of cruelty and racism. the reverend was 89. one community organization came together today to organize a plan to reduce crime in the city. the baltimore guarded angels held their second community meeting bringing together police, community leaders and officials to discuss ways that everyone can get involved to lower crime. >> what we hope to do is bring this group of people together and come up with some like- min
that forecast and the rest of the weekend coming up. >> one of the great soldiers in the civil rights movement have died. the reverend led protests and committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the community for four decades. we must give thanks to the reverend for his bravery, honesty, and righteous perseverance. the reverend was 89. >> baltimore county fire units were fighting a three alarm fire in a strip mall. this is on philadelphia boulevard. investigators say the fire appears to have started inside a chinese restaurant. the fire was upgraded to a heard alarm. -- third lot. >> the fire spread fairly rapidly, particularly in a restaurant where they have cooking oils and a lot of combustibles. that necessity as to upgrade the fire fairly quickly. >> the cause of the fire is under investigation. >> a bone marrow drive today to help those in need. the rector of the basilica of assumption in baltimore baltimore was diagnosed with leukemia in 2006. he has one transplant. doctors say that he needs a second transplant. the drive today is to raise awareness that
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